News and In the Know Facts & Tip Sheets


More news

More news

New Research Pinpoints Promising Gene Target For Specific Language Impairment

A study from the University of Kansas recently published in the peer-reviewed journal Brain Sciences identifies a new gene target related to Specific Language Impairment (SLI).

Keeping the Value in Education: Postdoctoral Training

In 2002, Joan Lorden, provost at the University of North Carolina - Charlotte, was interviewed by Joy Simpson, a member of the National Association of Science Writers.

Science at a Time of National Emergency

The following is a 2002 Interview with Martin Apple, President and CEO, Council of Scientific Society Presidents, by Joy Simpson:

Elderspeak – Is it helpful or just baby talk?

Like an automatic shift into low gear, we often revert to baby talk when communicating with seniors – regardless of the person's ability to understand and respond.

Keeping the Value in Education: Graduate School

In 2001, Joan Lorden, provost at the University of North Carolina - Charlotte, was interviewed by Joy Simpson, a member of the National Association of Science Writers.

Recovery from Stroke: New research on hidden deficits from stroke

This following is the third in a three-part series with Susan Jackson and Susan Kemper:

What is Speech-Language Therapy Like?

This article is the second in a three-part series with Susan Jackson and Susan Kemper:

Recovery from Stroke: Aphasia and rehabilitation

So it happened to your father. A brain attack. That's what they call a stroke. He survived, but he has trouble speaking and understanding what people say to him. It's a condition called aphasia. What are his chances of full recovery?

Frequently Asked Questions About Dyslexia

What is dyslexia? Dyslexia is difficulty learning to read and/or spell despite adequate instruction and opportunity to learn. It is a type of learning disability and is sometimes referred to as a specific reading disability.

Ten Things You Should Know About Children Coping with Terrorism

We know more about how adults react to war and disaster than we do children. But researchers are beginning to document how children are uniquely affected, and how they can best heal. Psychologists are increasingly called upon for help in recovery efforts.

Media Contact:

Jen Humphrey
Associate director, External Affairs
KU Life Span Institute
785-864-6621
jenhumphrey@ku.edu